Animal Artist ~ Diane Young

Every Picture tells a story – paintings of realistic and stylised animals


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From Idea to #Painting.

Sometimes I am asked where I get reference for my images.  So here is how I get from an idea to a painting.

The initial idea is scribbled in my sketchbook.  Usually my ideas arrive when I am not in my studio, it is most easy when my mind is wandering free. And hopefully my sketchbook is to hand.   At this point it is terribly unrefined.  Some of the sketches look like I cannot draw at all.

Sketch plan for painting Diane Young Sketch Book

The Idea

I then look for available references to get me to what I imagine that I wish to create.  In this case it is a boy sleeping with wolves.  I practice lots of sketches of wolves and sleeping children to get to know the shapes involved using the internet, books and my own photos if I have some.

Referencing and Practice:

Wolf Sketches by artist Diane YoungSketches for Painting of Boy with wolves by artist Diane YoungSketches of Wolves by artist Diane YoungSketch book drawings by artist Diane Young of Manic Illustrations STroud

I then use my practice sketches to make a convincing drawing of my original idea.   It is important to observe copyright on other people’s images.  They are used for practice and allow me to become familiar with the shapes.

My personal style then contributes to the form creating a painting which is truly unique. Finally others can see a hard copy of a snippet of my imagination.  The paper trail you see here is useful to me as no sooner has the process been completed without this trail in a short period of time I would not remember how the image formed in the first place!

Sketches of wolves by Diane Young ARtist

You may notice that I created the image and the background separately at first.

Sketch of Mowgli and Wolves by artist Diane Young of Manic Illustrations Stroud

This painting is now nearly completed.  My previous post shows my painting as of yesterday. Once the finishing touches have been made, I will scan it and post it into my Gallery page.

I often get ideas which would be impossible in real life, trying to make the idea look real is good fun.  If you put a lion on top of an elephant, or you balance 3 magpies on top of one another, it has to be believable.  Creating convincing images that are not like real life and making viewers believe the unbelievable is the greatest and most exciting challenge of all.

“Balancing Act” Prints Available.

Tower of animals elephant, lion, bear, flamingo, Painting by artist Diane Young

 

 

 

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Art, Painting and Unfinished Business

Painting, when to stop….

It happens so often, that artists actually stop working on a painting sometime after the vital moment when they should have stopped.   Spotting the optimum time to stop working on a piece is just so difficult as unless you could see into the future the you cannot anticipate whether your next few painting decisions will better or possibly worsen the painting’s outcome.  For this reason a good many paintings are over-worked and without a lot of experience this optimum moment can pass you by before you know it.

Painting of a wolf by Artist Diane YoungThis is a painting I have been working on today. It takes some concentration to be disciplined in the craft and it is best to work when feeling energised.  Once an artist tires and concentration waivers then sloppy decisions and actions are made leading to frustration and disappointment in the outcome.

I liken this process to swimming.  Whilst striving to get one’s swimming stroke right you need concentration, some discipline and energy.  Once the energy is depleted you fall back on old sloppy habits, inefficiency and then more tiredness is the outcome.   My painting and my swimming can go the same way.   This painting of a wolf is unfinished in my opinion.  It is just a matter of how far past the optimum point I persist…..